Wipe Out!!!

THE COMPLETE LIST:
   1. Santa Cruz, CA
   2. Haleiwa, HI
   3. Encinitas, CA
   4. Paia, HI
   5. San Clemente, CA
   6. Kill Devil Hills, NC
   7. Malibu, CA
   8. Montauk, NY
   9. New Smyrna Beach, FL
  10. Ocean City, NJ

Ultimately, the list accounts for styles, tastes, and preferences of all types illuminating the true variety of surf available to surfers in America. Taking the coveted number one spot is Santa Cruz, California, the real Surf City U.S.A., with its year-round surfable, if chilly, conditions and cultural melding pot of educators, artists, life long surfers and everyone else in between.

http://www.surfersvillage.com/surfing/41232/news.htm

I THINK THAT Santa Cruz, California is where I belong;)))…when it is Winter in Canada of course…..and just during the times when we have our annual, HORRIBLE SNOW STORMS!!! ~ Vaq

surfing seems cool………I find it relaxing to watch surfers do their thing….like staring at fish in a fishbowl….the way they twist and turn and “shred” ‘n stuff;)

Jordy Smith, Steamer Lane : photo ASP North America

CAN I TELL YOU A SECRET???

YOU HAVE TO PROMISE TO NEVER TELL A SOUL…

DO YOU PROMISE

IF YOU SAY ANYTHING …

I WILL NEVER SPEAK TO YOU AGAIN

OK…OK

DON’T TURN AROUND

HE’S HERE !!!

OMG

OMG!!

OK

I HAVE ONLY TWO CRUSHES IN THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD

ARE YOU READY

KELLY SLATER

AND

ROBIN THICKE

ALL THE OTHER GUYS ARE HOT

BUTN THESE TWO HUNKS

STOP MY HEART WHEN I HEAR THEIR VOICES

OR SEE THEIR FACES

EITHER IN PRINT OR

IN VIDEO!!!

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!!!

I FEEL SO MUCH BETTER NOW!

;)))

Sacred Craft Expo

http://quiksilverpro.com.au/videos.en.html#20110309083246VIDE602456457517dmlkZW8=

Sion Milosky drowns at Maverick's

IT’S A TOUGH AND DANGEROUS SPORT. ~ Vaq

The History of Surfing

It seems inevitable that the seafaring Polynesians, so skilled in all aspects of living near and sailing over the ocean, would be among the first people to surf the ocean waves.  Today the Hawaiian Islands are a mecca for surfers who come from all over the world to test themselves on Hawai‘i’s large and challenging waves. 

Increasingly popular in the Hawaiian Islands today, along with traditional surfing, are more modern water sports including tow-in surfing (using powered craft to pull a surfer into a giant wave), kite surfing (the surfer is pulled by a large parachute-like kite), and windsurfing (a sail is attached to the surfboard).

 O ‘Awili ka nalu, he nalu kapu kai na ke akua.

‘Awili is the surf, a surf reserved for the ceremonial bath of the goddess. 

Refers to Pele.  There were three noted surfs at Kalapana, Puna: Kalehua, for the children and those just learning to surf; Ho‘eu, for experienced surfers; and ‘Awili, which none dared to ride.  When the surf of ‘Awili was rolling dangerously high, all surfing and canoeing ceased, for that was a sign that the gods were riding.

                                                            (Pukui: 2356-257)

The First Surfers

Surfing waves on a surfboard was likely first done in the Society Islands, including Tahiti.  It was later in the Hawaiian Islands, however, that surfing really took hold.  The Hawaiian term for surfing is he‘e nalu (“to ride the waves”).

Hawaiians surfed waves on surfboards hundreds of years ago.  They also left petroglyphs of surfers carved into lava rocks, and there are stories of surfing in Hawaiian chants dated to at least 500 years ago (which means Hawaiians were probably surfing long before that). 

Surfing in the Hawaiian Islands was part of the Hawaiians’ kapu system, where ali‘i (the ruling class, or royalty) and maka‘āinana (commoners) had different status. 

The ali‘i, or ruling class, used surfboards that were from 14 to 16 feet (4 to 5 m) long.  The boards were carved from the buoyant wood of the wiliwili tree (Erythrina sandwicensis, Hawaiian coral tree).  A big surfboard like this made of premium wood was called an olo (also ‘ōwili, paha), and might weigh as much as 175 pounds (80 kg).  An ‘ōnini was a board used only by the best surfers.

Commoners used a 10- to 12-foot (3- to 3.7-m) board called an alaia (also called an omo), made from the denser, heavier and thus less buoyant wood of koa (Acacia koa), or the wood of the ‘ulu (Artocarpus altilis, breadfruit), which was also less buoyant.  A small board was known as a kīoe.

 Constructing a Surfboard

To make a surfboard, the craftsman first put a ceremonial fish (kūmū) in a hole near the tree’s roots and then completed a ritual showing respect.  The tree was cut down, and a bone, or a stone adze was used to shape the board. 

‘Ōahi (rough stone) or pōhaku puna (granulated coral) was used to put a smooth finish on the board, smoothing out the marks from the adze.

 O Kua‘ana ka nalu; o Paiaha‘a ka ‘āina.

Kua‘ana is the surf; Paiaha‘a the land. 

Proud were the people of Ka‘ū of the surf of Kua‘ana, where chiefs used to ride the waves to the shore of Paiaha‘a. 

                                                            (Pukui: 2472-270)

 http://www.hawaiianencyclopedia.com/the-history-of-surfing.asp

This is the story of the Hawaiian Islands, a beautiful and enchanted land, a place of pristine white sand beaches and luminous rainbows, waterfall-laced mountains and lush valleys—a rich landscape filled with rare and extraordinary plants, animals, fish, and birds that evolved in isolation for millions of years—a story of species evolution like nowhere else on Earth.

The ancient history of the Hawaiian people is a story of celestial navigators in voyaging canoes, ancient warriors and hard-fought battles, petroglyphs and temples of stone, gods and goddesses, kings and queens, hula dancers and sacred chants passed down through the generations.

Wooden sleds were ridden at high speeds down mountains in the sport of he‘e hōlua, and firebrands were hurled from cliffs in the ‘ōahi (fire-throwing) ceremony.

The post-contact era involves stories of foreign ship captains and sandalwood traders, sugar barons and whalers. There are also tales of Hawai‘i’s awesome natural forces, famous surfers and daring ocean rescues, mysterious disappearances at sea and perilous adventures in the rugged mountains—volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, landslides, and tsunamis—this is the story of the Hawaiian Islands.

Volcanic Origins

It all began many millions of years ago. A giant plume of liquid rock rose from thousands of miles deep in the Earth and burned up through the Earth’s crust, then erupted onto the Pacific seafloor nearly 20,000 feet (6,000 m) beneath the ocean’s surface.

Deep underwater a volcano formed, and the lava continued to build up layer upon layer for hundreds of thousands of years until finally the volcano’s summit reached the ocean’s surface, then rose above in a fit of steam and ash and molten rock—a volcanic island was born.

Thousands upon thousands of years passed as the island continued to grow. The upper layers of rock were gradually turned to soil by the wind and rain, and by the lichens and other plant species that took hold, multiplied, and over time evolved into completely new species—eventually the island supported a great variety of life.

Even as the volcanic island continued to erupt it was slowly pulled to the northwest by the movement of the Earth’s crust, and this made way for a new volcano to emerge over the stationary erupting plume of lava, and then another volcano formed, and then another and another, until eventually the whole chain of volcanoes, the Hawaiian Islands, had been created.

Polynesian Settlers—The First Hawaiians

The first Hawaiians were the Polynesians, a race whose roots extend back to some 6,000 years ago when ambitious sailors in voyaging canoes ventured farther and farther out from the Southeast Asian continent to inhabit Pacific islands.

More than 1,000 years ago those seafaring voyagers discovered the Hawaiian Islands, the most remote archipelago on Earth. These first Polynesian settlers of the Hawaiian Islands created an amazingly rich and complex Pacific island culture unlike any other.

Ke ēwe hānau o ka ‘āina.

The lineage born of the land. 

A native Hawaiian who is island-born and whose ancestors

were also of the land.

(Pukui: 1691-182)

MONEY?????? ~ Vaq

SURFERS ARE POLITICAL …..I GUESS it stems from  NEVER TURNING THEIR BACK ON THE OCEAN….~ Vaq

Surfers Launch Campaign To Save SharksSunday, November 9, 2008 By Martin Brody 1 Comment and No Reactions

We definitely perceive some irony here, and sorry, Steve Pike, but we don’t believe it’s based on misinformed views; sharks attack surfers. That is a fact. Their motives are the constant source of debate.

Surfer’s Village Global Surf News

South African surfers have teamed up with marine scientists to launch a campaign for the conservation of sharks. The Wavescapes Surf Film Festival and Save Our Seas Foundation (SOSF) will educate audiences about the global plight of sharks, which are being killed at the rate of 100 million a year.

Global head of the Foundation, Chris Clarke, said that the synergy was important “to create awareness for sharks and help pass on tips to reduce the risk of accidental encounters with the animals. We fear what we do not understand!”

Festival director Steve Pike said that a perceived irony about surfers coming out in support of their “traditional nemesis” was based on misinformed views. “Yes, surfers are at the frontline of the ocean. We aim to prove that healthy shark populations benefit surfers, and are not a threat.”

http://www.fearbeneath.com/2008/11/surfers-launch-campaign-to-save-sharks/

Protect Our Waves – Sites of Special Surfing Interest

Although the Protect Our Waves (POW) campaign was only launched in 2009, we’ve been protecting waves from one threat or another since our conception 21 years ago. But the Protect Our Waves campaign gives us the structure to legitimately expand our remit, concentrating on wave protection like never before.

Using our years of experience the POW campaign identified the most potent and widespread threats to waves around the UK. These include threats from over zealous onshore and offshore developments, surfers and waveriders right of access and of course, environmental impacts.

Since 2009 the POW campaign has been incredible active and has already been quoted by cabinet ministers in the Scottish Parliament, produced and disseminated 2 valuable scientific reports, rolled out multiple grass roots campaign actions and most importantly produced legislation that can specifically protect waves – a first for UK!

With the support of Rip Curl Planet, the strategy for 2011 will build on all of the above and ensure that protecting waves and recognizing potential threats is cemented in consciousness of all waveriders. Over the next 18 months we will be promoting and publicizing the major issues that encapsulate the POW campaign with emotive examples of world class waves around the UK currently under threat.

  • The Pentland Firth and especially the Orkneys, Scotland – an array of World-class waves threatened by offshore developments
  • The North East (Staithes) – Chronic sewage issues still mean surfing at this fantastic spot could represent a serious risk to your health.
  • Broad Bench – Kimmeridge Bay, South Coast – we will continue to work on increasing access to this amazing reef break, one of the best in the UK, to ensure surfers and wave riders can enjoy the full benefits of the spot.

Carve surf magazine are helping us increase the profile of POW issues by running exclusive features throughout the year on these and other threatened waves around the UK. As a special bonus for SAS members, the next four Pipelines will include a big pullout poster, illustrating these threatened perfect UK waves unloading their powerful energy onto our shore. The poster will outline the nature of the threat facing that wave and how the POW campaign is tackling the issue. But most importantly, the posters will detail exactly how you can actively help Protect Our Waves.

So make sure your SAS membership is up to date as these posters will look amazing and they’ll be a great tool to help you protect waves.


http://www.sas.org.uk/tag/protect-our-waves/

NO, I AM NOT A COMMUNIST …HOWEVER, I DO BELIEVE IN WORKING WITH OTHERS AND IN TEAMWORK …..YOUNG PEOPLE UNDERSTAND THE CONCEPT—– THEY HAVE UNFORTUNATELY –JUST GIVEN UP ON ADULTS, GETTING IT “RIGHT”—-KIDS NEED GUIDANCE NOT UNTIMATUMS :(((

The term “Mindless Escapism” was invented for this movie, and at 10am on a rain soaked London morning Blue Crush offers much in the way of visual relief. A gush of colour like sticks’ of seaside rock swirls through the opening credits to violently transport us to Maui: surfers paradise. Generic shots of people surfing are distorted with bright purples, pinks and greens, fluorescent yellows and oranges that stream through the brain like a tap of running rainbow. After the sugar rush has subsided it becomes evident that we are in teen paradise land, where anything is possible if you are under twenty, blond and beautiful.

I GUESS I’M A SUCKER…..’CAUSE I LOVED THE MOVIE:)))…..WHAT DO YOU EXPECT FROM A TEEN HOLLYWOOD MOVIE???…I THINK IT WAS GREAT ~ Vaq

HOLLYWOOD NEEDS TO DO A NEW ONE  THOUGH — AND THIS TIME FILM IT LIKE “THE LORDS OF DOGTOWN” – WITH A TOUCH OF “BLOW” WITH A BIT OF “FACTORY GIRL” BUT NOT TOO DARK ….ADD A SLICE OF “SIDEWAYS” FOR THE PROTEIN AND A LIKKLE SUGAR….PUT REAL AMAZING TOP SURFERS IN IT….BUT NOT A DOCUMENTARY….LOTS OF WOMEN WHO LOOK LIKE REAL SURFERS…………….HELL, THERE ARE REAL PRO FEMALE SURFERS— FIND THEM TOO!!!!!   A HOLLYWOOD FILM WITH KELLY SLATER AND STERLING SPENCER AS ADVISORS ON IT …..YAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!

THAT’S IT I’M MOVING TO HOLLYWOOD……..NO! THEY NEEEEED ME…..I HAVE TO GO WHERE I AM LOVED AND NEEDED:*

http://www.futuremovies.co.uk/review.asp?ID=24

http://surfsister.com/

2002: Blue Crush Trailer HQ

64 videosAlert iconSubscribed

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ljN7SEEwhmM

Kate Bosworth and Michell Rodriguez in ‘Blue Crush’

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzuQmt4wvnQ&NR=1&feature=fvwp

http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Buddhism/2006/08/Ride-Of-A-Lifetime.aspx

Photo: http://www.hawaii.rr.com/leisure/reviews/neal_miyake/2004-04_rshots.htm

Gazing at the Horizon

Depending on the day, surfing is mostly paddling and waiting. We spend a lot of time gazing at the horizon, reading waves as they first appear on the horizon as a ripple, and jockeying to get in the right position. There is a lot of meditative awareness involved here. The whole experience is a contemplation of the relationship of the body to infinity.

There are many skills to surfing, and as the surfer masters them, awareness is freed up to be with the ongoing ecstasy of the situation. Every wave is different. Every day is different. The tide is always changing, coming in or going out. The swell is always building or fading. The waves, as they roll through a break, move the sand beneath them, which changes the shape of the following waves. The ocean invites the surfer to perceive each ripple, and each moment, as individual, never to be repeated. This surfer throws herself in to this universe of rhythms and dances.

http://www.lorinroche.com/page119/page126/page126.html

PEACE and LOVE ALWAYS!

~Vaq

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s